Walter: I quite like weddings. DId I ever tell you about the time your mother and I, God rest her soul, got married? She was so beautiful, Peter. So beautiful in white. I won’t deny I was never happier.

thiccbitch:

people need to understand that some people just don’t like talking it has nothing to do with u so don’t take it personally like some people just aren’t talkers and they’ll probably never text u first or initiate a conversation and it’s not because they don’t like u it’s just that they don’t think to say anything bc they’re comfortable with not saying anything

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

tastefullyoffensive:

Video game store makes the most of their broken shutters. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

Video game store makes the most of their broken shutters. [x]

troyesivan:

its kinda scary when you waste an entire day doing nothing and time just passes

handsomedogs:

This is Bentley, our 9 week old Welsh Corgi puppy, who had a run around the garden over the weekend

handsomedogs:

This is Bentley, our 9 week old Welsh Corgi puppy, who had a run around the garden over the weekend

quodl:

Everything you ever were or ever will be… gone.

ohhhhhx hiitttttt

anthonymackies:

Anthony Mackie @ Good Morning America (April 3, 2014).

distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.
However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.
The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.
While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.

However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.

The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.

While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

cybergata:

Grass in the Wind, Meditations by Shironeko

cybergata:

Grass in the Wind, Meditations by Shironeko